Discover Moscow with our free appGET
Moscow
Moscow
All
Attractions
Guides
Plan your best adventure quick and easy

Pick attractions, food & activities
Everything in sync with the App
Plan with the app

The best photo spots in Moscow

Moscow, Russia

Collection of 7 places
The Safest place of the City Bunker 42
Historical Building
1

The Tangansky Protected Command Point, also known as An-02 (1947), FS-293 (1951), FS-572 (1953), and GO-42 (from 1980), as well as RFQ "Tagan", and now Exhibition Complex Bunker 42, is a once-secret military complex, bunker, and Spare Long-Range Aviation Command Post (ET-42) in Moscow, Russia, near the underground Moscow Metro station Taganskaya. It has an area of 7,000 square meters (75,000 sq ft) and is situated at a depth of 65 meters (213 ft) below ground.

Underground Moscow Moscow Metro
Metropolitan
2

The Moscow Metro is a rapid transit system serving Moscow, Russia and the neighbouring Moscow Oblast cities of Krasnogorsk, Reutov, Lyubertsy and Kotelniki. Opened in 1935 with one 11-kilometre (6.8 mi) line and 13 stations, it was the first underground railway system in the Soviet Union. As of 2017, the Moscow Metro excluding the Moscow Central Circle and Moscow Monorail has 207 stations and its route length is 349.4 km (217.1 mi), making it the sixth longest in the world. The system is mostly underground, with the deepest section 84 metres (276 ft) underground at the Park Pobedy station, one of the world's deepest.

Stalin’s Skyscrapers Seven Sisters Moscow
Skyscraper
3

The Seven Sisters are a group of seven skyscrapers in Moscow designed in the Stalinist style. The term "Seven Sisters" is neither used nor understood by the local population; Muscovites call them Vysotki or Stalinskie Vysotki, meaning "(Stalin's) high-rises" (or "Stalinist skyscrapers"). They were built from 1947 to 1953, in an elaborate combination of Russian Baroque and Gothic styles. The seven are: Hotel Ukraina, Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Apartments, the Kudrinskaya Square Building, the Hilton Moscow Leningradskaya Hotel, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs main building, the main building of the Moscow State University, and the Red Gates Administrative Building. There were two more skyscrapers in the same style planned that were never built: the Zaryadye Administrative Building and the Palace of the Soviets.

The tallest Orthodox Christian church in the world. Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
Cathedral
4

The Cathedral of Christ the Savior is a Russian Orthodox cathedral in Moscow, Russia, on the northern bank of the Moskva River, a few hundred meters southwest of the Kremlin. With an overall height of 103 metres (338 ft), it is the tallest Orthodox Christian church in the world. The current church is the second to stand on this site. The original church, built during the 19th century, took more than 40 years to build, and was the scene of the 1882 world premiere of the 1812 Overture composed by Tchaikovsky. It was destroyed in 1931 on the order of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. The demolition was supposed to make way for a colossal Palace of the Soviets to house the country's legislature, the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. Construction started in 1937 but was halted in 1941 when Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union during World War II. Its steel frame was disassembled the following year, and the Palace was never built. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the current church was rebuilt on the site during 1995–2000.

The Gate to the City Poklonnaya Hill
Hills
5

Poklonnaya Gora (literally "bow-down hill"; metaphorically "Worshipful Submission Hill"') was, at 171.5 metres, one of the highest spots in Moscow. Its two summits used to be separated by the Setun River, until one of the summits was razed in 1987. Since 1936, the area has been part of Moscow and now contains the Victory Park with many tanks and other vehicles used in the Second World War on display. Historically, the hill had great strategic importance, as it commanded the best view of the Russian capital. Its name is derived from the Russian for "to bow down", as everyone approaching the capital from the west was expected to do homage here. During the French invasion of Russia in 1812, it was the spot where Napoleon in vain expected the keys to the Kremlin to be brought to him by Russians.

An unparalleled Basil Saint Basil's Cathedral
Cathedral
6

The Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed , commonly known as Saint Basil's Cathedral, is a church in the Red Square in Moscow, Russia. The building, now a museum, is officially known as the Cathedral of the Intercession of the Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat or Pokrovsky Cathedral. It was built from 1555–61 on orders from Ivan the Terrible and commemorates the capture of Kazan and Astrakhan. It was the city's tallest building until the completion of the Ivan the Great Bell Tower in 1600.

The core of Moscow Red Square
Square
7

Red Square is a city square (plaza) in Moscow, Russia. It separates the Kremlin, the former royal citadel and now the official residence of the President of Russia, from a historic merchant quarter known as Kitai-gorod. Red Square is often considered the central square of Moscow since Moscow's major streets, which connect to Russia's major highways, originate from the square.

Save to My trip
Saved
15