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Tokyo, Japan

Collection of 7 places
Walk to Shibuya crossing Shibuya
District
1

Shibuya (渋谷区, Shibuya-ku), literally "Astringent Valley", is a special ward in Tokyo, Japan. A major commercial and business centre, it houses the two busiest railway stations in the world, Shinjuku Station and Shibuya Station. As of May 1, 2016, it has an estimated population of 221,801 and a population density of 14,679.09 people per km2 (38,018.7/sq mi). The total area is 15.11 km2 (5.83 sq mi). The name "Shibuya" is also used to refer to the shopping district which surrounds Shibuya Station, one of Tokyo's busiest railway stations. This area is known as one of the fashion centers of Japan, particularly for young people, and as a major nightlife area.

Cherry blossoms at Nakameguro
District
2

Nakameguro (中目黒) is a quiet residential district of Meguro, Tokyo. It is popular for its unique boutique cafes and stores, and becomes a vibrant and active location particularly along the Meguro River during the Cherry Blossoms festival in mid-spring. The district is situated along Yamate Dōri Ave and on the southern region of Komazawa Dōri Ave. Since Nakameguro Station is located not in this district but in northern Kamimeguro, the place name Nakameguro is often used for the larger region encompassing Nakameguro and Kamimeguro as well as a small portion of Aobadai and Higashiyama. Yūtenji, built in 1718, is a temple of the Pure Land Buddhism located on the easternmost part of Nakameguro. Note that Yūtenji is also the name of a district adjacent to Nakameguro in Meguro, but it is not the Yūtenji district that is home to the temple.

Do a "Cosplay" Harajuku
District
3

Harajuku (原宿, listen ) is a district in Shibuya. Harajuku is the common name given to a geographic area spreading from Harajuku Station to Omotesando, corresponding on official maps of Shibuya ward as Jingūmae 1 chōme to 4 chōme. Harajuku is known internationally as a center of Japanese youth culture and fashion. Shopping and dining options include many small, youth-oriented, independent boutiques and cafés, but the neighborhood also attracts many larger international chain stores with high-end luxury merchandisers extensively represented along Omotesando. Harajuku Station on the JR East Yamanote Line and Meiji-jingumae 'Harajuku' Station served by the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line and Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line also act as gateways to local attractions such as the Meiji Shrine, Yoyogi Park and Yoyogi National Gymnasium, making Harajuku and its environs one of the most popular destinations in Tokyo for both domestic and international tourists.

The center of the sumo world Ryōgoku Kokugikan
Stadium
4

Ryōgoku Kokugikan (両国国技館, Ryōgoku Kokugikan), also known as Ryōgoku Sumo Hall, is an indoor sporting arena located in the Yokoami neighborhood of Sumida, one of the 23 wards of Tokyo in Japan, next to the Edo-Tokyo Museum. It is the third building built in Tokyo associated with the name kokugikan. The current building was opened in 1985 and has a capacity of 11,098 people. It is mainly used for sumo wrestling tournaments (honbasho) and hosts the Hatsu (new year) honbasho in January, the Natsu (summer) honbasho in May, and the Aki (autumn) honbasho in September. It also houses a museum about sumo. The venue is also used for other indoor events, such as boxing, pro wrestling, and music concerts. In past years, it has hosted the finals of New Japan Pro Wrestling's annual G1 Climax tournament as well as the Invasion Attack and King of Pro-Wrestling events and the WWE's The Beast in the East event in 2015.

Dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and his wife Meiji Shrine
Sanctuary
5

Meiji Shrine (明治神宮, Meiji Jingū), located in Shibuya, Tokyo, is the Shinto shrine that is dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shōken. The shrine does not contain the emperor's grave, which is located at Fushimi-momoyama, south of Kyoto.

Tokyo's oldest temple Sensō-ji
Temple
6

Sensō-ji (金龍山浅草寺, Kinryū-zan Sensō-ji) is an ancient Buddhist temple located in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan. It is Tokyo's oldest temple, and one of its most significant. Formerly associated with the Tendai sect of Buddhism, it became independent after World War II. Adjacent to the temple is a five-story pagoda, Shinto shrine, the Asakusa Shrine, as well as many shops with traditional goods in the Nakamise-dōriThe Sensoji Kannon temple is dedicated to Kannon Bosatsu, the Bodhisattva of compassion, and is the most widely visited spiritual site in the world with over 30 million visitors annually.It ranks among the top 10 temples in Japan for the number of visitors in the new year.

Cherry blossoms Ueno Park
Park
7

Ueno Park (上野公園, Ueno Kōen) is a spacious public park in the Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. The park was established in 1873 on lands formerly belonging to the temple of Kan'ei-ji. Amongst the country's first public parks, it was founded following the western example as part of the borrowing and assimilation of international practices that characterizes the early Meiji period. The home of a number of major museums, Ueno Park is also celebrated in spring for its cherry blossoms and hanami. In recent times the park and its attractions have drawn over ten million visitors a year, making it Japan's most popular city park.

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