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Lisbon's most Instagrammable

Lisbon, Portugal

Collection of 19 places
Breathe the air from Miradouro de Santa Catarina
Panoramic Point
1

The Santa Catarina viewpoint, also known as the Adamastor viewpoint, is located on one of Lisbon’s seven hills and is famous not only as a lookout, but also as a retreat for observers. Tradition tells us that, between the 16th and 18th centuries, this was the place to admire the ships on the water, one of them being the helpless departure of the Portuguese royal family to Brazil, from which resulted in the popular proverb "seeing ships from the top of Santa Catarina". Accept the invitation of one of the several marble benches at the Santa Catarina viewpoint to sit and see much more than ships from up high... to contemplate the comfort of its garden, the Tejo River landscape, the 25 de Abril Bridge, the Christ the King statue, downtown Lisbon and the next door neighborhood of Madragoa... Take in each little detail!

One of the most Lisbon-"er" thing to see Ascensor da Bica
Traditional Transport
2

The Bica Funicular (Portuguese: Ascensor da Bica), sometimes known as the Elevador da Bica (Bica Lift), is a funicular railway line in the civil parish of Misericórdia, in the municipality of Lisbon, Portugal. It connects the Rua de São Paulo with Calçada do Combro/Rua do Loreto, operated by Carris. When the elevator turns off in the late afternoon, take the chance to visit this steep alley and its many nice and cozy bars.

The understatedly cool and trendy district of Lisbon Cais do Sodre
Street
3

Cais do Sodre is the understatedly cool and trendy district of Lisbon, which has spearheaded the recent transformation of the city from traditional, to progressive and liberal. The once neglected area has become fashionable, as new shops, cafes and bars open, while the entire water front has undergone a much-needed rejuvenation. There is a lot for tourists to love about Cais do Sodre, with a riotous nightlife, delicious food from the Timeout market or the simple relaxed vibe of the Ribeira das Naus.

Stunning views from Castelo dos Mouros
Castle
4

The Castle of the Moors (Portuguese: Castelo dos Mouros) is a hilltop medieval castle located in the central Portuguese civil parish of Santa Maria e São Miguel, in the municipality of Sintra, about 25km northwest of Lisbon. Built by the Moors in the 8th and 9th centuries, it was an important strategic point during the Reconquista, and was taken by Christian forces after the fall of Lisbon in 1147. It is classified as a National Monument, part of the Sintra Cultural Landscape, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Palace Of Mystery Quinta da Regaleira
Palace
5

Quinta da Regaleira is an estate located near the historic center of Sintra, Portugal. It is classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO within the "Cultural Landscape of Sintra". Along with the other palaces in the area such as the Quinta do Relógio, Pena, Monserrate and Seteais palaces, it is considered one of the principal tourist attractions of Sintra. The property consists of a romantic palace and chapel, and a luxurious park that features lakes, grottoes, wells, benches, fountains, and a vast array of exquisite constructions.

A fairytale castle Palácio Nacional da Pena
Palace
6

The Pena Palace (Portuguese: Palácio da Pena) is a Romanticist castle in São Pedro de Penaferrim, in the municipality of Sintra, Portugal. The castle stands on the top of a hill in the Sintra Mountains above the town of Sintra, and on a clear day it can be easily seen from Lisbon and much of its metropolitan area. It is a national monument and constitutes one of the major expressions of 19th-century Romanticism in the world. The palace is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the Seven Wonders of Portugal. It is also used for state occasions by the President of the Portuguese Republic and other government officials.

"...to honor the elder ones living nearby..." Beco das farinhas
Street
7

Walls can tell the story of a place. In an old part of Lisbon, Camilla Watson has turned these stories into photos displayed on the walls of a local courtyard. The black and white photos set on wood or sometimes directly on the wall itself. The title of the exhibition is “A Tribute,” and its pictures portray elderly people (who actually live in the hood or used to) playing dominoes, or framed in doorways and windows, or just standing in the middle of the street. Go there and see for yourself this magical corner.

The End Of The World Cabo da Roca
Lighthouse
8

Cabo da Roca (Cape Roca) is a cape which forms the westernmost extent of mainland Portugal, continental Europe and the Eurasian land mass. The cape is in the Portuguese municipality of Sintra, near Azóia, in the southwest of the district of Lisbon, forming the westernmost extent of the Serra de Sintra. The windswept cliffs of Cabo de Roca were believed to be the edge of the world up until the up until the late 14th century and the spectacular, desolate scenery adds to the allure of the location. The raging Atlantic Ocean waves pound the base of the massive jagged cliffs while challenging hiking trails follow the coastal paths. The isolated atmosphere of Cabo da Roca is enhanced by the very limited development in the area; there is a lighthouse, coffee shop and gift shop but nothing much else. This wind blasted and dramatic landscape is the attraction and this is what most visitors expect for the western edge Europe or end of the world.

Should a beach this special be kept a secret? Praia da Ursa
Beach
9

Set on the Atlantic west coast just north of Cabo da Roca is a little gem of a beach: Praia da Ursa, where thousands of years of the Atlantic's wind and waves have carved the rocks and cliffs into interesting shapes. Unspoiled and wild, this little beach is often cited as one of the most beautiful in the area (it is...believe me). The name of the beach comes from the "Rocha da Ursa" (bear rock) one of two huge sea stacks at the northern end of the beach. It is said that the rock resembles a bear with its cub... This stunning natural beach shows itself at his best at sunset, when the sun starts to set it cast long shadows over the golden sand...a truly magical experience.

Ultramodern Station Gare do Oriente
Station
10

Gare do Oriente (Portuguese pronunciation: [ɡaɾ(ɨ) du oɾiˈẽt(ɨ)]), or alternately, the Lisbon Oriente Station is one of the main Portuguese intermodal transport hubs, and is situated in the civil parish of Parque das Nações, municipality of Lisbon.

A Funny, Typical and Relaxing way to discover Lisbon Tram 28
Traditional Transport
11

The number 28 Lisbon tram connects Martim Moniz with Campo Ourique, and passes through the popular tourist districts of Graca, Alfama, Baixa and Estrela. For visitors, this is the classic Lisbon tram journey, riding in the quaint yellow tram as it screeches and rattles through the narrow streets of the city. The delightful Remodelado trams date from the 1930s and in any other city they would be housed in a museum, but in Lisbon they are an integral part of the public transport network. These historic trams are still in use, as the 28 route is completely unsuitable for modern trams due to its numerous tight turns and steep gradients. A ride along the entire 28 tram route provides one of the best tours of the capital and is often a highlight of any holiday to Lisbon.

The Best ceiling you'll ever see Convento do Carmo
Instagrammable
12

The Convent of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (Portuguese: Convento da Ordem do Carmo) is a former-Roman Catholic convent located in the civil parish of Santa Maria Maior. The medieval convent was ruined during the sequence of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, and the destroyed Gothic Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (Portuguese: Igreja do Carmo) on the southern facade of the convent is the main trace of the great earthquake still visible in the old city.

On top of Lisbon Santa Justa Lift
Panoramic Point
13

The Santa Justa Lift (Portuguese: Elevador de Santa Justa, pronounced [elɨvɐˈdoɾ dɨ ˈsɐ̃tɐ ˈʒuʃtɐ]), also called Carmo Lift (Portuguese: Elevador do Carmo, [elɨvɐˈdoɾ du ˈkaɾmu]), is an elevator, or lift, in the civil parish of Santa Justa, in the historical city of Lisbon, Portugal. Situated at the end of Rua de Santa Justa, it connects the lower streets of the Baixa with the higher Largo do Carmo (Carmo Square). Insider's Tip: During High Season is usually very crowded, in case you don't like queuing, you can have a similar experience near the Convento Do Carmo.

Lisbon's Main Square Praça do Comércio
Square
14

The Praça do Comércio (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpɾasɐ du kuˈmɛɾsju]; English: Commerce Square). Situated near the Tagus river, the square is still commonly known as Terreiro do Paço ([tɨˈʁɐjɾu du ˈpasu]; English: Palace Yard), because it was the location of the Paços da Ribeira (Royal Ribeira Palace) until it was destroyed by the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake. After the earthquake, the square was completely remodeled as part of the rebuilding of the Pombaline Downtown, ordered by Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal, who was the Minister of the Kingdom of Portugal from 1750 to 1777, during the reign of Dom José I, King of Portugal.

Majestic UNESCO Tower Belém Tower
Tower
15

Belém Tower (Portuguese: Torre de Belém, pronounced [ˈtoʁ(ɨ) dɨ bɨˈlɐ̃ȷ̃]) or the Tower of St Vincent is a fortified tower located in the civil parish of Santa Maria de Belém in the municipality of Lisbon, Portugal. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site (along with the nearby Jerónimos Monastery) because of the significant role it played in the Portuguese maritime discoveries of the era of the Age of Discoveries. The tower was commissioned by King John II to be part of a defense system at the mouth of the Tagus river and a ceremonial gateway to Lisbon.

Watching over Lisbon São Jorge Castle
Castle
16

São Jorge Castle (Portuguese: Castelo de São Jorge; Portuguese pronunciation: [kɐʃˈtɛlu dɨ sɐ̃w̃ ˈʒɔɾʒ(ɨ)]; Saint George Castle) is a Moorish castle occupying a commanding hilltop overlooking the historic center of the Portuguese city of Lisbon and Tagus River. The strongly fortified citadel dates from medieval period of Portuguese history, and is one of the main tourist sites of Lisbon.

A romantic window on the city Miradouro de Santa Luzia
Panoramic Point
17

This romantic terrace by the church of Santa Luzia introduces visitors to Alfama with a sweeping view over its houses, churches, and the Tagus River. On an outside wall of the church are two tile panels, one of Comercio Square before the earthquake, and another showing Christians attacking St. George's Castle in 1147. The cafe on the terrace is a good place for a drink before climbing to the castle nearby.

A massive beauty Jerónimos Monastery
Monastery
18

The Jerónimos Monastery or Hieronymites Monastery (Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Portuguese pronunciation: [muʃˈtɐjɾu duʃ ʒɨˈɾɔnimuʃ]), is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.

Christ the Redeemer's little brother Cristo Rei
Sanctuary
19

The Sanctuary of Christ the King (Portuguese: Santuário de Cristo Rei) is a Catholic monument and shrine dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ overlooking the city of Lisbon situated in Almada. It was inspired by the Christ the Redeemer statue of Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil, after the Cardinal Patriarch of Lisbon visited that monument. The project was inaugurated on 17 May 1959, while Portugal was ruled by the authoritarian President of the Council of Ministers António de Oliveira Salazar who gave his final permission for the project. The giant statue in cement was erected to express gratitude because the Portuguese were spared the effects of World War II.

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